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Horses, dogs and children… Sage Advice from an Australian Jackaroo

Silhouette of a CowboyMy school in Wubin had a program that linked you with a “pen friend”. This was sort of like an old fashioned “facebook friend”. My pen friend was called Michael Boladaris and he lived on Wonganoo station that was miles out of Wiluna in the Western Desert.

We sent letters to each other for many years all the way through primary and high school. At the Wiluna gymkhana we would meet and hang out together.

Going outback to the gymkhana was a long adventure of driving down roads into the desert often not seeing another car for up to half a day.

We would drive by soft yellow sand plain with a mad profusion of crazy coloured wildflowers, and then into the red dirt that got up your nose in your ears and every crevice of everything.

 

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Beautiful red dirt with a pristine blue sky.

We would stop along the way in deserted gold mining towns and we children would fossick for junk.

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Desert finds. In the past there were many gold mining towns near the roads. These are now just concrete. broken glass and bits of metal with the odd find.

Finally we would be in Wiluna and camp in the bush as there were no caravan parks.

No showers or toilets for camping in those days, we would just camp somewhere flat use the showers provided at the gymkhana and when we felt the need we grabbed a shovel and squatted behind a bush.

Families  would cook on an open fire and after dinner we would sit around  and gaze into the fire or someone would grab a guitar and sing.

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Fire gazing — the original TV

We would all be so exhausted from the gymkhana that as soon as it was really dark we would sleep in our swags under a pitch black sky with a myriad of diamond like stars.

I would watch for satellites — they were really infrequent then, and then I would go to sleep with the sound of the wind, cicadas and at times; night birds.

One night just as twilight was occurring and dinner was cooking on the open fire a old guy was sitting with my family around the campfire.

camp-cooking
Open fire cooking makes the food taste better — sort of smoky and crispy.

I remember that the bush had that soft orange glow that it gets as the last rays of sun hit the tops of the low bushes and reflects from the gum leaves. There was a quietness in that evening where sound carried for a long distance.

This man was probably somewhere between 25 – 30 years old and seemed so OLD to the young me. He was dressed in jeans, heeled cowboy boots, and a check shirt. His body was lean and muscular with skin that was thickened and dark from the sun. Around his eyes were smile wrinkles with white in the crinkles where the sun didn’t tan due to his habit of smiling.

He gently cajoled me aside from my family through the scrub and away from the fire in that beautiful early evening. I clearly remember the beauty of that soft light on the bushes, and the quiet.

I was a shy farm child but he felt OK and he worked hard at overcoming my shyness until he really had me on my own and had my total attention.

He then gently and repeatedly told me some of the best advice I have ever been given in my life and it was:

“Never go with a man who is not kind to horses, dogs and children.

If they are not kind to horses, dogs and children they will not be kind to you.”

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Check out how people treat their dogs and that is how they will treat you.

He asked me to repeat it for him to show that I understood and then lead me back to the fire.

In my life, I have noticed that this advice is true for both men and women — if they are not kind I know not to give them much attention — to leave them alone.

The times I have not used this advice I have always regretted it.

I have never forgotten that man and I wish I could thank him.

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